Dun da de Sewolawen: The Heart of Silence

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On the world of Kobaïa, Siri and her friends Dewa and Toli are sailing away.

They are sailing away from their parents who they have outgrown, they are sailing away from their civilisation that is only a handful of generations old, and which in its turn has sailed away from the fear that was their original homeworld.

Across the undêm and alone, an electric ritual awaits them: a leviathan of the deep and a darkness that took Siri’s own brother many years ago in its black tentacles.

Out there in The Heart of Silence.

Dun da de Sewolawen is the tale of rites of passage and bonds of friendship in the tradition of Hayao Miyazaki and Christian Vander. It is also possibly the only existing example of Zeuhl literature.

My Zeuhl novelettino Dun da de Sewolawen is now out in a gorgeous print edition from Polyversity Press. Snap it up here!

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Investigating Weird Portland 2014

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2This is the last blog post about my American travels, and for me it’s the most spectacular one. I had always wanted to use my copy of Chuck Palahniuk’s Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon as an actual tourist guide. And while it was impossible to follow it step-by-step – I have no idea where the self-cleaning house is, am not particularly interested in strip clubs, and the Portland Memorial is closed to the public these days unless you have relatives interred there – I did get to see most of the landmarks and shops and curiosities. I had a Big Wave Hawaiian lager at the Tiki bar mentioned in the book, I found the tour through the Shanghai tunnels (including sinister stories of waking up in total darkness with a hangover and no shoes and the floor strewn with broken glass: they’ve got trunks of men’s boots down there) – and I even had a chance to go to Mount Angel Abbey and have a look at their museum of curiosities. There I found: taxidermied deformed animals (two versions of eight-legged calf!), giant pig bezoars, an “authentic” replica of the Crown of Thorns using thorns from a shrub researched by a quite enthusiastic Franciscan Brother, strange international versions of “imported” Virgin Marys, and the most well-preserved and well-made collection of taxidermied wildlife I’ve ever seen, all arranged in “life-like” poses of interaction and often in combat.

You can find my pictures here. (I’ve deliberately kept my attempted “ghost photography” from inside the Shanghai tunnels; skip the pictures if you get bored by them.)